VCE Subject Outcomes – Unit 3

Updated January 2019

English & EAL

The focus of this unit is on reading and responding both orally and in writing to a range of texts. Students analyse how the authors of texts create meaning and the different ways in which texts can be interpreted. They develop competence in creating written texts by exploring ideas suggested by their reading within the chosen Context, and the ability to explain choices they have made as authors. Students will study the film text Invictus and the novel In the Country of Men. Students will also be exposed to contemporary media texts and relevant materials from different sources to analyze the points of view, persuasive techniques and analysis of language.

Area of Study 1 – Reading and responding

Outcome 1

On completion of this unit the student should be able to analyse, either orally or in writing, how a selected text constructs meaning, conveys ideas and values, and is open to a range of interpretations.

Area of Study 2 – Creating and presenting

Outcome 2

On completion of this unit the student should be able to draw on ideas and/or arguments suggested by a chosen Context to create written texts for a specified audience and purpose; and to discuss and analyse in writing their decisions about form, purpose, language, audience and context.

Area of Study 3 – Using language to persuade

Outcome 3

On completion of this unit the student should be able to analyse the use of language in texts that present a point of view on an issue currently debated in the Australian media, and to construct, orally or in writing, a sustained and reasoned point of view on the selected issue.

Biology

In this unit, students consider the molecules and biochemical processes that are indicators of life. They investigate the synthesis of bio-macromolecules and biochemical processes that are common to autotrophic and heterotrophic life forms. Students consider the universality of DNA and investigate its structure; the genes of an organism, as functional units of DNA and code for the production of a diverse range of proteins in an organism. Students investigate the significant role of proteins in cell functioning; how technological advances have enabled scientists to determine differences in the molecular structure of proteins, how the structure of a protein relates to its function in an organism’s tissues, and how technological advances have given rise to applications such as the design of proteins for specific purposes.

Students consider advances in proteomics applied, for example, to medical diagnosis. Students investigate how cells communicate with each other at molecular level in regulating cellular activities; how they recognise ‘self’ and ‘non-self’ in detecting possible agents of attack; and how physical barriers and immune responses can protect the organism against pathogens. Students consider the technological advances that have contributed to our knowledge and understanding of molecular biology and thereby appreciate the dynamic nature of science. Students apply concepts related to the structure, function, activities, needs and regulated death of cells.

Area of Study 1 – Molecules of life

Outcome 1

On completion of this unit the student should be able to analyse and evaluate evidence from practical investigations related to biochemical processes.

Area of Study 2 -Detecting and responding

Outcome 2

On completion of this unit the student should be able to describe and explain the use of the stimulus- response model in coordination and regulation and how components of the human immune system respond to antigens and provide immunity.

Chemistry

In the first area of study students use a variety of analytical techniques to analyse products in the laboratory. They conduct volumetric analyses using acid-base and redox titrations and standard solutions, and carry out gravimetric analyses. They are also introduced to instrumental analytical techniques of spectroscopy and chromatography. Students review and apply their understanding of stoichiometry as they complete calculations related to their practical investigations. Students related\ the operation of the analytical techniques and instruments to the chemical reactions and the chemical structures of the materials that are being analysed. In the second area of study students investigate systematic organic chemistry including production of starting materials for particular reaction pathways. Students use molecular models and conduct simple laboratory investigations to observe the properties and reactions of different homologous series and functional groups. Students investigate the use of biochemical fuels. They design reaction pathways to prepare organic compounds from given starting materials. Students also investigate the role of organic chemicals in the development of medicine.

Area of Study 1 – Chemical analysis

Outcome 1

On completion of this unit the student should be able to evaluate the suitability of techniques and instruments used in chemical analyses.

Area of Study 2 – Organic chemical pathways

Outcome 2

On completion of this unit the student should be able to identify and explain the role of functional groups in organic reactions and construct reaction pathways using organic molecules.

Physics

In VCE Physics students develop a range of inquiry skills involving practical experimentation and research, analytical skills including critical and creative thinking, and communication skills. Students use scientific and cognitive skills and understanding to analyse contemporary physics-related issues and to communicate their views from an informed position. VCE Physics provides for continuing study pathways within the discipline and leads to a range of careers. The study is made up of four units. There are no prerequisites for Unit 1, 2 and 3, but students must undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking Unit 4. Unit 3 consists of two prescribed areas of study: Motion in One and Two Dimensions; and Electronics and Photonics. Unit 4’s areas of study are Electric Power; and Interactions of Light and Matter. In addition to that the area of study, Materials and Their Use in Structures has been chosen from six detailed studies.

Area of Study 1 – Motion in one and two dimensions

Outcome 1

On completion of this unit the student should be able to investigate motion and related energy transformations experimentally, and use the Newtonian model in one and two dimensions to analyse motion in the context of transport and related aspects of safety, and motion in space.

Area of Study 2 – Electronics and photonics

Outcome 2

On completion of this unit the student should be able to investigate, describe, compare and explain the operation of electronic and photonic devices, and analyse their use in domestic and industrial systems.

Psychology

The conscious self This unit focuses on the study of the relationship between the brain and the mind through examining the basis of consciousness, behaviour, cognition and memory. Advances in brain research methods have opened new ways to understanding the relationship between mind, brain and behaviour. Students study the structure and functioning of the human brain and nervous system, and explore the nature of consciousness and altered states of consciousness including sleep. The brain continually receives and processes vast amounts of information from its internal and external environment. Memory involves the selective retention and retrieval of this information and it plays an important role in determining behaviour. Students consider the function of the nervous system in memory and investigate the ways in which information is processed, stored and utilised. They apply different theories of memory and forgetting to their everyday learning experiences. Students analyse research methodologies associated with classic and contemporary theories, studies and models, consider ethical issues associated with the conduct of research and the use of findings, and apply appropriate research methods when undertaking their own investigations.

Area of Study 1 – Mind, brain and body

Outcome 1

On completion of this unit the student should be able to explain the relationship between the brain, states of consciousness including sleep, and behaviour, and describe the contribution of selected studies to the investigation of brain function.

Area of Study 2 – Memory

Outcome 2

On completion of this unit the student should be able to compare theories that explain the neural basis of memory and factors that affect its retention, and evaluate the effectiveness of techniques for improving and manipulating memory.

Further Mathematics

This semester students explore the presentation, summary, description and analysis of univariate and bivariate data. They perform regression analysis, including independent and dependent variables, fitting lines to bivariate numerical data, by eye, the three median line (as a graphical technique) and the least squares methods, interpretation of slope and intercepts, and use of lines to make predictions; extrapolation and interpolation; residual analysis to check quality of fit. They display, summarise and describe time series data, including qualitative analysis of time series; recognition of trend, seasonal, cyclic and random patterns; seasonal adjustments; seasonal effects and indices, deseasonalisation of the data using yearly averages; median smoothing (as a graphical technique) and smoothing using a moving average with consideration of the number of terms required and centering where required; fitting a trend line to data by eye, by three median fit (as a graphical technique) or by the least squares method and forecasting using trend lines (with the data deseasonalised where necessary). They study the graphical representation and analysis of linear and non-linear relations as models for various practical contexts as well as graphical and algebraic approaches to solving equations and inequalities. They construct and interpreted graphs, including the construction and interpretation of straight-line graphs, line segment graphs and step graphs to represent practical and everyday situations. They also studied linear programming, including the transfer from a description of an optimisation problem to its mathematical formulation, including the introduction of variables, constraints and an objective function and systems of linear inequalities and their graphs.

Area of Study – Data analysis // – Recursion and financial modelling

Outcome 1

On completion of this unit the student should be able to define and explain key concepts and apply related mathematical techniques and models as specified in Area of Study 1 in routine contexts.

Outcome 2

On completion of this unit the student should be able to select and apply the mathematical concepts, models and techniques as specified in Area of Study 1 in a range of contexts of increasing complexity.

Outcome 3

On completion of this unit the student should be able to select and appropriately use numerical, graphical, symbolic and statistical functionalities of technology to develop mathematical ideas, produce results and carry out analysis in situations requiring problem-solving, modelling or investigative techniques or approaches.

Mathematical Methods CAS

This semester students explore the behaviour of functions of a single real variable, including key features of their graphs such as axis intercepts, stationary points and points of inflection, domain (including maximal domain) and range, asymptotic behaviour and symmetry. They sketch and analyse the graphs of power functions, exponential functions, logarithmic functions, circular functions and modulus function. They sketch graphs of polynomial functions and inverse functions. They also study graphical treatment of limits, continuity and differentiability (including local linearity) of functions of a single real variable. They study the algebra of functions, including composition of functions, simple functional equations, inverse functions and the solution of equations. They identify appropriate solution processes for solving equations, and systems of simultaneous equations, presented in various forms. They recognise equations and systems of equations that are solvable using inverse operations or factorisation, and used graphical and numerical approaches for problems involving equations where exact value solutions are not required or which are not solvable by other methods.

Area of Study 1- Functions and graphs

Area of Study 2 – Algebra

Area of Study 3 – Calculus

Area of Study 4 – Probability and Statistics

Outcome 1

On completion of each unit the student should be able to define and explain key concepts as specified in the content from the areas of study, and apply a range of related mathematical routines and procedures.

Outcome 2

On completion of each unit the student should be able to apply mathematical processes in non-routine contexts, including situations requiring problem-solving, modelling or investigative techniques or approaches, and analyse and discuss these applications of mathematics.

Outcome 3

On completion of each unit the student should be able to select and appropriately use numerical, graphical, symbolic and statistical functionalities of technology to develop mathematical ideas, produce results and carry out analysis in situations requiring problem-solving, modelling or investigative techniques or approaches.

Visual Communication and Design

This semester, students gain an understanding of the process designer’s employ to structure their thinking and communicate ideas with clients, target audiences, other designers and specialists. Through practical investigation and analysis of existing visual communications, students gain insight into how the selection of methods, media, materials and the application of design elements and design principles can create effective visual communications for specific audiences and purposes. They investigate and experiment with the use of manual and digital methods, media and materials to make informed decisions when selecting suitable approaches for the development of their own design ideas and concepts. Students use their research and analysis of visual communication designers to support the development of their own work. They establish a brief and apply design-thinking skills through the design process. They identify and describe a client, two distinctly different needs of that client, and the purpose, target audience, context and constraints relevant to each need.

Besides that, students also developed design concepts and two final presentations of visual communications to meet the requirements of the brief. This involves applying the design process twice to meet each of the stated needs. Having completed their brief and generated ideas earlier, students continue the design process by developing and refining concepts for each need stated in the brief. They utilise a range of digital and manual two- and three-dimensional methods, media, and materials. They investigate how the application of design elements and design principles creates different communication messages with their target audience. As students revisit stages to undertake further research or idea generation when developing and presenting their design solutions, they develop an understanding of the iterative nature of the design process. Ongoing reflection and evaluation of design solutions against the brief assists students with keeping their endeavors focused. Students refine and present two visual communications within the parameters of the brief. They reflect on the design process and the design decisions they took in the realisation of their ideas. They evaluate their visual communications and devise a pitch to communicate their design thinking and decision making to the client.

Area of Study 1 – Analysis and practice in context

Outcome 1

On completion of this unit the student should be able to create visual communications for specific contexts, purposes and audiences that are informed by their analysis of existing visual communications.

Area of Study 2 – Design industry practice

Outcome 2

On completion of this unit the student should be able to describe how visual communications are designed and produced in the design industry and explain factors that influence these practices.

Area of Study 3 – Developing a brief and generating ideas

On completion of this unit the student should be able to apply design thinking skills in preparing a brief, undertaking research and generating a range of ideas relevant to the brief.

Business Management

In this unit students investigate how large-scale organisations operate. Students examine the environment (both internal and external) in which large-scale organisations conduct their business, and then focus on aspects of individual business’ internal environment and how the operations of the business are managed. Students develop an understanding of the complexity and challenge of managing large-scale organisations and have the opportunity to compare theoretical perspectives with practical applications.

Area of Study 1 – Large-scale organisations in context

Outcome 1

On completion of this unit the student should be able to discuss and analyse the context in which large-scale organisations operate.

Area of Study 2 – Internal environment of large-scale organisations

Outcome 2

On completion of this unit the student should be able to discuss and analyse major aspects of the internal environment of large-scale organisations.

Area of Study 3 – The operations management function

Outcome 3

On completion of this unit the student should be able to discuss and analyse strategies related to operations management.

Accounting

This unit focuses on financial accounting for a single activity trading business as operated by a sole trader and emphasises the role of accounting as an information system. Students use the double entry system of recording financial data and prepare reports using the accrual basis of accounting. The perpetual method of stock recording with the First In, First Out (FIFO) method is also used.

Area of Study 1 – Recording financial data

Outcome 1

On completion of this unit the student should be able to record financial data for a single activity sole trader using a double entry system, and discuss the function of various aspects of this accounting system.

Area of Study 2 – Balance day adjustments and reporting and interpreting accounting information

Outcome 2

On completion of this unit the student should be able to record balance day adjustments and prepare and interpret accounting reports.

Informatics

In Informatics, students focus on data, information and information systems. In Unit 3 students consider data and how it is acquired, managed, manipulated and interpreted to meet a range of needs. In Area of Study 1 students investigate the way organisations acquire data using interactive online solutions, such as websites and applications (apps), and consider how users interact with these solutions when conducting online transactions. They examine how relational database management systems (RDBMS) store and manipulate data typically acquired this way. Students use software to create user flow diagrams that depict how users interact with online solutions, and acquire and apply knowledge and skills in the use of an RDBMS to create a solution. Students develop an understanding of the power and risks of using complex data as a basis for decision-making. In Area of Study 2 students complete the first part of a project. They frame a hypothesis and then select, acquire and organise data from multiple data sets to confirm or refute this hypothesis. This data is manipulated using tools such as spreadsheets or databases to help analyse and interpret it so that students can form a conclusion regarding their hypothesis. Students take an organised approach to problem solving by preparing project plans and monitoring the progress of the project. The second part of the project is completed in Unit 4.

Area of Study 1 – Organisations and data management

Outcome 1

On completion of this unit the student should be able to design a solution, develop it using a relational database management system, and diagrammatically represent how users interact with an online solution when supplying data for a transaction.

Area of Study 2 – Data analytics: Drawing conclusions

Outcome 2

On completion of this unit the student should be able to use a range of appropriate techniques and processes to acquire, prepare, manipulate and interpret complex data to confirm or refute a hypothesis, and formulate a project plan to manage progress.